Dr. Takako TODA

  • Professor, Graduate School of Japanese Applied Linguistics, Waseda University
  • Ph.D. in Linguistics, First Class Honors, Australian National University

Takako Toda is the author of Second language speech perception and production: Acquisition of phonological contrasts in Japanese.

Second language speech perception and production: Acquisition of phonological contrasts in Japanese offers original analysis of the acquisition of Japanese phonology. This study provides a useful insight to the field of second language acquisition theory, and offers pedagogical implications. This book was written for linguists (phonologists, researchers in Second Language Acquisition, researchers in Applied Linguistics), language teachers (English, Japanese, etc) and students [Description of the book].

Contact Details

Office
Graduate School of Japanese Applied Linguistics, Waseda University
1-7-14 Nishi-Waseda, Shinjuku-ku
City/Zip/State: Tokyo 169-8050 JAPAN
Phone
+81-3-5286-1896 (ext. 71-5364)
E-mail
toda@waseda.jp

Publication

Toda, T. (2006). Focus on form in teaching connected speech.

Perspectives on teaching connected speechThis book is a collection of fourteen articles on connected speech of interest to teachers, researchers, and materials developers in both ESL/EFL (ten chapters focus on connected speech in English) and Japanese (four chapters focus on Japanese connected speech). The fourteen chapters are divided up into five sections:

  • What do we know so far about teaching connected speech?
  • Does connected speech instruction work?
  • How should connected speech be taught in English?
  • How should connected speech be taught in Japanese?
  • How should connected speech be tested?

Second Language Speech Perception and Production: Acquisition of Phonological Contrasts in Japanese. TODA, Takako. (2003: University Press of America).

Abstract

Second Language Speech Perception and ProductionThe timing organization of phonological durational contrasts is known to be one of the most challenging areas in the acquisition of Japanese phonology. This study examines the acquisition of phonological durational contrasts in Japanese, and aims to contribute to second language acquisition theory from the viewpoint of interlanguage phonology. Acoustic techniques were used to investigate the mechanisms of English-speaking learners' speech perception and production.

In the past, researchers considered that foreign accents in the pronunciation of second language learners could be explained by the differences between phonological systems of the learners’ native language and target language. In the last few decades, developments in the field of second language acquisition research have made us aware that various factors are influential in the phonological acquisition of a second language.

The results reveal that various processes, other than negative transfer are operative in the formation of English-Japanese interlanguage phonology. Factors, such as positive transfer, overexaggeration, phonetic approximation and implementation strategies are seen in the developmental processes of learners’ language acquisition. The implication of these results for teaching methodology is also discussed in order to improve instruction of Japanese pronunciation.

Finally, three areas of second language acquisition research, which are worth investigating for their likely contribution, are suggested for future study.

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Introduction: Acquisition of Second Language Phonology; Previous Cross- Linguistic Studies; Problems in the Acquisition of Japanese Phonology; Aims of the Study; Organization of the Study
  • Linguistic Theories and Acoustic Research on the Mora: Phonological Concept of the Mora; Acoustic Investigations on Mora; Acoustic Studies on Acquisition of Japanese Phonology; Summary
  • Perception: Method; NS; Beginners; Advanced Learners; Discussion
  • Production: Method; NS; Beginners; Advanced Learners; Discussion
  • Longitudinal Study- Perception: Subjects; Procedure; First Experiment; Second Experiment; Third Experiment; Discussion
  • Longitudinal Study- Production: Subjects; Procedure; First Experiment; Second Experiment; Third Experiment; Discussion
  • Conclusion

Full list of publications. (Japanese)

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